purge


purge
[c]/pɜdʒ / (say perj)

verb (purged, purging)
verb (t)
1. to cleanse; rid of whatever is impure or undesirable; purify.
2. to eliminate, as by killing, an unwanted person, as a political opponent or potential opponent.
3. to clear (a person, etc.) of imputed guilt.
4. to clear away or wipe out legally (an offence, accusation, etc.) by atonement or other suitable action.
5. Also, purge away, purge out. to remove by cleansing or purifying.
6. to clear or empty (the bowels, etc.) by causing evacuation.
7. to cause evacuation of the bowels of (a person).
verb (i)
8. to become cleansed or purified.
9. to undergo or cause purging of the bowels.
noun
10. the act or process of purging.
11. something that purges, as a purgative medicine or dose.
12. the elimination from political activity, as by killing, of political opponents and others.
13. the period when such an elimination takes place: he disappeared in Stalin's great purge of 1936–38.
14. Colloquial any alcoholic beverage.
phrase
15. purge from, to expel from: to purge undesirables from a group.
16. purge of, to rid or clear of: to purge a party of undesirable members.
{Middle English, from Old French purgier, from Latin purgāre cleanse}
purger, noun

Australian English dictionary. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • purge — [ pyrʒ ] n. f. • 1538; « justification » XIVe; de purger 1 ♦ Action de purger; remède purgatif. ⇒ purgation. Prendre une purge. 2 ♦ (1752) Vx Désinfection. ♢ (1860) Mod. Techn. Nettoyage des fils textiles (qu on débarrasse de …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • purge — [pɜːdʒ ǁ pɜːrdʒ] verb [transitive] to get rid of information that is no longer needed, especially when combining lists of information * * * Ⅰ. purge UK US /pɜːdʒ/ verb [T] ► to remove people from an organization because you do not want them:… …   Financial and business terms

  • Purge — Purge, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Purged}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Purging}.] [F. purger, L. purgare; purus pure + agere to make, to do. See {Pure}, and {Agent}.] 1. To cleanse, clear, or purify by separating and carrying off whatever is impure, heterogeneous …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • purge — / pərj/ vt purged, purg·ing 1: to clear (as oneself or another) of guilt purged himself of contempt 2: to become no longer guilty of purge the contempt Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Mer …   Law dictionary

  • Purge — Purge, n. [Cf. F. purge. See {Purge}, v. t.] 1. The act of purging. [1913 Webster] The preparative for the purge of paganism of the kingdom of Northumberland. Fuller. [1913 Webster] 2. That which purges; especially, a medicine that evacuates the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • purgé — purgé, ée (pur jé, jée) part. passé de purger. 1°   Débarrassé de ce qui est grossier. Des métaux purgés par le feu.    Fig. •   Purgée, par ses désastres, des restes de l idolâtrie, elle [Rome] ne subsiste plus que par le christianisme qu elle… …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • Purge — Purge, v. i. 1. To become pure, as by clarification. [1913 Webster] 2. To have or produce frequent evacuations from the intestines, as by means of a cathartic. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • purge — [n] elimination, removal abolition, abstersion, catharsis, clarification, cleaning, cleanup, coup, crushing, disposal, disposition, ejection, eradication, evacuation, excretion,expulsion, expurgation, extermination, extirpation, liquidation,… …   New thesaurus

  • purge —   [engl.], löschen …   Universal-Lexikon

  • purge — épurge …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • purge — (v.) late 13c., from O.Fr. purgier (12c.), from L. purgare cleanse, purify, from Old L. purigare, from purus pure (see PURE (Cf. pure)) + root of agere to drive, make (see ACT (Cf. act)). The noun is recorded from 1560s …   Etymology dictionary


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